Beading

Attaching Clasps to Beaded Jewelry
Bead Board - makes beading easy!
Beading tips
Beading F.A.Q.
Knotting with Tweezers
Stringing Cords
Stringing Wire
Birthstones
Crimping & Crimp Cover Instructions
Easy Ear Wire
Knowing Your Beads



Crafts

Bow Making
Candle Burning
Decoupage with Mod Podge
Folding the American Flag
Floral Tablescaping
General Tips
Melted Crayon Art
Photo Booth with Props - How to set up
Sculpey
Styrofoam
Tillandsia Care (Air Plant)
Vinyl Lettering



Framing

Conservation Framing
How to Hang and Care for your Pictures



Needle Arts

Knit with Milly Video: Blocking
Knit with Milly Video: Cast On
Knit with Milly Video: Cast Off
Knit with Milly Video: Knit Stitch
Knit with Milly Video: Purl Stitch
Knit with Milly Video: Knit a Starbella Scarf
Knifty Knitter Looms
Knitting & Crochet Abbreviations
Knitting Instructions
Yarn Weight System



Painting

Acrylic Paints: which one to use?
Basics of Brushes
Clay Pot Preparation
Coloring Items Using Alcohol Ink
Crackling
Glitter, Sparkle, Shimmer & Shine
Painting Mediums / Products Information
Painting Surfaces
Painting Tips
Sealers
Tin Preparation
Wood Preparation



Paper Crafts

Accu-Cut Die-Cut Machines
Creative Card Making
Distress Inks with Tim Holtz
Getting Started on a Scrapbook
Glossary of Stamp Terms & Techniques
Inking 101
Marbled Look Created with Alcohol Ink
Masking Techniques - Rubber Stamping
Scrapbooking on the Wall - Canvas Art
Taking Gift Tag Art One Step Further
Tear Paper, HOW TO
Twinkling H20's



Sewing

Blanket Stitching
Choosing the right THREAD
Fabric Conversions
Fabric and Sewing Project Tips
Glossary of Sewing / Quilting Terms
How to Wash your Fabric and Quilts
Stuffing (Fiberfill)

Distress InksTM - written by Tim Holtz

This information was reprinted courtesy of Ranger Inks

Here are some key points that make Distress Inks different:

Distress Inks - 6 colorsSTAYS WET LONGER - (allows you to blend and shade on photos and paper - also emboss) other dye inks dry too fast especially on photos so you end up with lines and marks if you go direct from the pad.

COLOR WICKS OR SPREADS OUT - (these inks will travel across the surface of your paper when spritzed with water) other dyes do not travel as much although they might bleed a little when wet, the Distress Inks actually "wick" or spread out much further creating several tone on tones.

COLOR STABILITY - (the colors of the Distress Inks will not break down when wet or heated allowing you to have more color control for the finished look) other "brown colored" dyes will break down when water is added leaving a pink & green hue.

COLOR PALETTE - Well these are unlike ANY other colors of inks you've seen.
The color palette of Distress Inks is :

Colors

* Antique Linen (the color of aged lace or linens found in the cherished heirlooms of grandmother's trunk)

* Old Paper (the color of weathered and timeless book pages tucked away in the attic for generations)

* Tea Dye (the orange hue of saturated tea bags with the results of dying in a tea bath for days)

* Vintage Photo (this color is captured right out of the photographs from times gone by)

* Walnut Stain (a rich, dark stain of an old walnut tree perfect to create a dark wash of color).

* Black Soot (from the depths, a black like no other - this is the one you've been searching for)

TO DISTRESS: I like to use water when I am distressing. I think it gives the papers more of a weathered texture, so here's how I start. Working on any type of paper (manila, cardstock, or text weight), crumple the paper up - always press in the center of any heavyweight cardstock or manila stock - this will break the surface tension of the paper and allow you to crumple up the paper easier without tearing it. Next rub the Distress pads over the surface - you can work with several different colors or just one - WALNUT STAIN IS IDEAL FOR THIS. Then spray the inked surface with water (you will immediately notice the ink "travels" outward when water is applied as these inks are designed to react with water). Heat the surface to dry - and here's why... Although you don't have to Heat Set these inks for any reason, I like to dry the water using either my Heat-It Craft Tool or an iron. This will allow for more tone control and keep areas dark and others light. Ironing the paper will also give you a much smoother surface to stamp on without compromising the aged finish. *If you allow the surface to air-dry most of your color will end up on the edges only because the paper will bend and buckle when wet, forcing the ink and water to the edges. Notice that these Distress Inks retain their color value even when wet and dried. Other brown dyes will break down in color (sometimes leaving a pink and green hue).

FOR STAMPING: What can I say about the many stamping applications these inks can achieve. Once again the special formulation on these Distress Inks provides a versatile finish on papers yet still allow for "normal" stamping applications. I like to stamp on uncoated (matte) papers and immediately rub the image with a cloth - this will soften or shadow your image WITHOUT smudging any detail - VINTAGE PHOTO, WALNUT STAIN, TEA DYE, BLACK SOOT - wonderful for this one! Another surface is glossy cardstock - keep in mind this is a different type of dye ink so when you stamp on glossy, certain areas of your image will "bead" up, once again providing a Distressed look without you doing a thing (this is probably one of my most favorite looks) - some areas of the image appear "pitted". Brayering on glossy cardstock is also wonderful because you can still manipulate the inks with different tools, brushes, your fingers, whatever. Even after the ink is applied you can achieve amazing texture and color shading.

ON PHOTOS: FINALLY an ink formulated for photos! Whether you're a scrapbooker or not you can use all types of photos (vintage or new ones) on your cards and pages. The Distress Inks work on all types of photos - inkjet, laser, toner copies, regular photos (matte or glossy) and even color photos! Start by using the lightest colors ANTIQUE LINEN or OLD PAPER with either a brayer or DTP (direct to photo). Cover the photo in the lighter colors, blend the colors with a brush or your finger after you apply the inks - these inks stay wet long enough for you to blend out any lines or marks other ink pads leave on photos. Next age the edges with VINTAGE PHOTO or WALNUT STAIN by applying the pad directly to the edges - soften and mix the tones with a brush or your finger too. Of course to complete the aged process lightly sand - YES SAND - the photo with medium grit sand paper. Don't go over anyone's face, but just make a few scratches here and there.

Re-InkersTHE RE-INKERS: The Distress re-inkers are so versatile and fun, especially the bottles they're in! These vintage looking glass dropper vials are perfect for aging a "batch" of tags, fibers, linens or whatever, in baths of Distress Inks & water. You can also create your own palette on your craft sheet using the reinkers and hand tint any black and white photo color by color (very fun thing to do). I also like using the resist ink or Perfect Medium and the reinkers to create amazing stained backgrounds on papers. Enjoy the journey…