Beading

Attaching Clasps to Beaded Jewelry
Bead Board - makes beading easy!
Beading tips
Beading F.A.Q.
Knotting with Tweezers
Stringing Cords
Stringing Wire
Birthstones
Crimping & Crimp Cover Instructions
Easy Ear Wire
Knowing Your Beads



Crafts

Bow Making
Candle Burning
Decoupage with Mod Podge
Folding the American Flag
Floral Tablescaping
General Tips
Melted Crayon Art
Photo Booth with Props - How to set up
Sculpey
Styrofoam
Tillandsia Care (Air Plant)
Vinyl Lettering



Framing

Conservation Framing
How to Hang and Care for your Pictures



Needle Arts

Knit with Milly Video: Blocking
Knit with Milly Video: Cast On
Knit with Milly Video: Cast Off
Knit with Milly Video: Knit Stitch
Knit with Milly Video: Purl Stitch
Knit with Milly Video: Knit a Starbella Scarf
Knifty Knitter Looms
Knitting & Crochet Abbreviations
Knitting Instructions
Yarn Weight System



Painting

Acrylic Paints: which one to use?
Basics of Brushes
Clay Pot Preparation
Coloring Items Using Alcohol Ink
Crackling
Glitter, Sparkle, Shimmer & Shine
Painting Mediums / Products Information
Painting Surfaces
Painting Tips
Sealers
Tin Preparation
Wood Preparation



Paper Crafts

Accu-Cut Die-Cut Machines
Creative Card Making
Distress Inks with Tim Holtz
Getting Started on a Scrapbook
Glossary of Stamp Terms & Techniques
Inking 101
Marbled Look Created with Alcohol Ink
Masking Techniques - Rubber Stamping
Scrapbooking on the Wall - Canvas Art
Taking Gift Tag Art One Step Further
Tear Paper, HOW TO
Twinkling H20's



Sewing

Blanket Stitching
Choosing the right THREAD
Fabric Conversions
Fabric and Sewing Project Tips
Glossary of Sewing / Quilting Terms
How to Wash your Fabric and Quilts
Stuffing (Fiberfill)

What is a mask?

Information courtesy of Sugarloaf Products, Inc

A mask is applied to cover the image in order to create a background, or to stamp other images without interfering with or stamping on top of the first image. A mask can also be used to protect the area around a stamped image. This is called a mortise mask. By masking the images you are working with you can create all sorts of professional looking effects in your art.


Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background1 - Using the same stamp (of the one you stamped on your art.) stamp onto a piece of light weight paper. A Post-It note or 20# copier is a good weight.

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background2 - Carefully cut out around the out line of the image. I cut just inside the out line of the image. This slightly 'smaller than the image' mask will compensate for the thickness of the paper. Then, when you stamp over the mask there won’t be a gap between the first image and the background, or the first image and the others you plan to add.

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background3 - Apply a small amount of temporary adhesive to the back of the mask. This will keep the mask from shifting after it is applied on the art.

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background4 - Lay the mask carefully over the image on your art. Now you can stamp on top of it without stamping on it. Stamp the next element of your composition directly over the mask.

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background5 - When you remove the mask you will see that the last element you stamped will appear to be BEHIND the first image. The main thing to remember is, the things you stamp first will be on top. If you keep this always in mind when masking, you can plan some very realistic looking art.

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background6 - There is a second type of mask… This is called a mortise mask. A mortise mask protects the area around the image. I often save my regular masks by tacking them onto the matching mortise mask. Creating is easier if you have everything you need all together.

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background7 - With a mortise mask you can use sponges and inks, chalk, splatter, or texture on an image without worry of going outside the lines!

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background8 - In the case of this Hibiscus, I chose to sponge the bamboo with brown ink. I plan to color the flower in with pencils, so I won’t need that mortise mask now.

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background9 - As I mentioned in step 5, a regular mask will create layers behind the first images you stamp. A mortise mask will create layers ON TOP of the image. This is not only great for coloring your image with chalk, ink, and sponges. You can use a mortise mask to add interesting images and textures to background stamps, create “windows” and shapes on your art, and to protect the negative areas while you work.

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background10 - You can stamp, mask, and add new images or layers as many times as you want. Simply leave your first masks in place and apply the next mask over it. You can create very complex scenes, exquisite vintage layers, or do an incredible, but fast and easy, card for that birthday you forgot about.

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background11 - Back to the Hibiscus… I’m creating a fast background by sponging green ink around the masked flower and bamboo. This is a very simple way to convert a couple of stamped images into an artistic composition.

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background12 - The Hibiscus is ready to color and then attach, with layered paper, to a card or to use as an element on a project or a page. Because the masks had already been made, and saved in the See D™ box along with the matching stamps, this project took less time to create then it took you to read these steps!

Mask - apply mask to cover the image in order to create a background13 - Save your masks! Once you have taken the time to make a mask, it can be used over and over again. I just tack my masks to the wood mount or store them in the See D’s™ box. This little leaf mask is very old. I have used it so many times over the years you can no longer see the image through the over stamped ink, but the mask still works great!